MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Critical Versus Optional, but Desireable Claim Elements

On August 6, 2014, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in ScriptPro, LLC v. Innovation Associates, Inc. In 2006, the Petitioner ScriptPro, LLC sued Innovation Associates, Inc. for infringement of claims 1, 2, 4, and 8 of U.S. Patent No. 6,910,601 ("the '601 patent").  The '601 patent describes a "collating unit" that uses sensors to automatically dispense and organize prescriptions according to individual patients.  Shortly after the lawsuit was filed, Innovation Associates filed an Inter Partes Reexamination with the USPTO, and the district court stayed the proceedings pending the result of the re-exam.  In January of 2011, the USPTO concluded its reexamination of the claims of the '601 patent, confirming claims 1, 2, 4, and 8. 

 

The district court resumed proceedings and Innovation Associates moved for summary judgment, arguing that the claims were invalid under section 112 on the grounds that the patent's specification did not describe the subject matter of the asserted claims.  The claims at issue did not require the use of sensors.  However, the district court agreed with Innovation Associates that the specification of the '601 patent implied that the use of "sensors" is critical to the functionality of the machine. Specifically, the court held, "no reasonable jury could find that the inventors were in possession of a collating unit that operated without sensors." Accordingly, the district court granted Innovation Associate's motion for summary judgment of invalidity for failure to satisfy the written description requirements of § 112. 

 

On appeal, the Federal Circuit reviewed de novo the language of the specification and—after pointing to several places in the specification suggesting the sensor may or may not be used—found that the wording of the specifications made the sensors an "optional, though desirable," feature of the invention.  The Court also pointed to the original claims as filed and noted "[w]hen a specification is ambiguous about which of several features are stand-alone inventions, the original claims can help resolve the ambiguity, though even original claims may be insufficient as descriptions or be insufficiently supported by the rest of the specification."  The Federal Circuit reversed the grant of summary judgment holding that, ScriptPro could establish that a person of skill in the art would be able to tell from description of the specification that "the inventor[s] actually invented the invention claimed."  The Court concluded that, although the machine would be more efficient with the sensors, it could be fully functional without them and, therefore, the written description was sufficient.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: USPTO Issues Preliminary Guidance on Patentability Based on Alice Corp.

On June 25, 2014 the USPTO Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy released a Memorandum to the Patent Examining Corps that provides examiners with preliminary instructions related to subject matter eligibility of claims involving abstract ideas under 35 U.S.C. § 101 in view of the Supreme Court Decision in Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International.  The memo provides the following guidance with respect to the application of the Mayo framework to the examination of claims involving abstract ideas in light of the Alice decision:

 

(1)  Alice Corp. establishes that the same analysis should be used for all types of judicial exceptions, whereas prior USPTO guidance applied a different analysis to claims with abstract ideas (Bilski guidance in MPEP 2106(II)(B)) than to claims with laws of nature (Mayo guidance in MPEP 2106.01).

 

(2)  Alice Corp. also establishes that the same analysis should be used for all categories of claims (e.g., product and process claims), whereas prior guidance applied a different analysis to product claims involving abstract ideas (relying on tangibility in MPEP 2106(II)(A)) than to process claims (Bilski guidance).

 

The memo then explains that, despite these changes, the basic inquiries and examination procedures as to subject matter eligibility remain the same after the Alice decision. 

 

The instructions also set out a "Two-Part Analysis for Abstract Ideas."  First, the examiner is to determine whether the claim is directed to an abstract idea such as "fundamental economic practices," "certain methods of organizing human activities," "an idea of itself," or "mathematical relationships/formulas."   If the examiner concludes that the claim is directed to an abstract idea, the examiner must then determine "whether any element, or combination of elements, in the claim is sufficient to ensure that the claim amounts to significantly more than the abstract idea itself."  The instructions provide examples of what would qualify and what would not qualify as "significantly more" as referenced in the Alice decision: 

 

Would qualify: Improvement to technology or technical field, improvements to functioning of computer itself, and "meaningful limitations."

 

Would not qualify:  Adding the words "apply it," and requiring no more than a generic computer to perform generic computer functions.

 

The instructions direct examiners to reject claims under 35 U.S.C. § 101 as being directed to non-statutory subject matter if they do not amount to "significantly more" than the abstract idea. 

 

These examination instructions are only initial guidelines, and will be updated and modified as needed after additional consideration of the decision and public feedback.  Accordingly, the USPTO has issued a Request for Comments and Extension of Comment Period on Examination Instruction and Guidance Pertaining to Patent-Eligible Subject Matter that is open through July 31, 2014. 

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: USPTO Glossary Pilot Program

The USPTO has instituted a new program, the Glossary Pilot Program, which began June 2, 2014. The program will allow applicants for computer-related inventions to petition to make special entry into the Glossary Pilot Program with the filing of an application. Applications accepted into this pilot program will receive expedited processing and be placed on an examiner’s special docket prior to the first office action, with special status up to the issuance of the first Office action.

This program is set to run for six (6) moths through December 31, 2014, but may be cut off once the USPTO accepts 200 grantable petitions.  The program is intended to encourage the use of a glossary that provides clear definitions for some terms used in the claims in order to help the reader understand the disclosed invention with a higher level of clarity.

In order to qualify for the Glossary Pilot Program, all of the conditions set forth in the Federal Register Notice, must be met. Specifically:

(1)   The application must be an original, non-reissue, non-provisional utility application that does not claim benefit of a prior filed non-provisional U.S. application, unless the application is a continuation-in-part application filed for the purposes of providing a glossary.

(2)   The application and petition must use Form PTO/SB/436 and must be filed after June 2, 2014 and before the pilot deadline expires.

(3)   The claimed invention must be classified in one of the Art Areas related to computer-related and business method inventions, including those involving Computer Architecture Software and Information Security (Technology Center 2100); Computer Networks, Multiplex, Cable and Cryptography/Security (Technology Center 2400); Communications (Technology Center 2600); and Transportation, Electronic Commerce, Construction, Agriculture, Licensing and Review (Technology Center 3600).  The complete list of qualifying Art Areas is available here.

(4)   The glossary must be placed at the beginning of the detailed description portion of the original specification of the application, identified with a heading, and presented on filing of the application. Definitions for key terminology found in the claims, terms with special definitions, abbreviations, relative terms, terms of degree and functional terminology should be provided, but cannot rely on other parts of the application for completeness, cannot consist of what the term does not mean, cannot be open-ended, cannot consist solely of examples and synonyms, and cannot be disavowed elsewhere in the specifications.

(5)   Filing must be done via EFS-Web.

(6)   The application must contain at least one claim, but no more than four independent claims, and no more than 30 claims total.

 

Status of the petition will be available via Private PAIR. If a dismissal decision is received, the applicant can file a petition if it is believed that the dismissal is not proper. Also, any preliminary amendment filed after the application has entered the pilot program but before the issuance of the first Office Action will be entered unless the amendment causes the application to be non-compliant with the requirements of the program. More information can be found at the USPTO's website.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Federal Circuit Finds Clones Unpatentable

The Federal Circuit issued its opinion in In re Roslin Institute, a case involving cloned animals.  The Roslin Institute (Roslin) owns a patent for methods of cloning animals, based on the work that created Dolly the Sheep.  The inventors of that patent also assigned to Roslin an application claiming protection for the clones themselves.  During prosecution, the USPTO deemed the claims to the clones contained in that application to be directed to non-statutory subject matter under 35 U.S.C. § 101 because the clones constituted a natural phenomenon that did not possess markedly different characteristics than any found in nature.  The USPTO decision was appealed to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, which upheld the rejection. 

 

On appeal to the Federal Circuit, the appellate court affirmed the PTAB decision, concluding that genetic identity of a clone to a progenitor/donor animal precludes it from patent protection, despite the fact that such a clone itself does not exist in nature.  The court held that "clones are exact genetic copies of patent ineligible subject matter, [and as a result] they are not eligible for patent protection."

 

Interestingly, the court dismissed Roslin's arguments that environmental factors lead to phenotypic differences between its clones and their donor mammals that render their claimed subject matter patentable, stating that any such differences were not claimed.  In contrast, the court focused on the genetic aspect of the clones—which although similarly unclaimed—the court determined was implicit in the use of the term "clones".  The court further discounted any phenotypic differences as being the result of "environmental factors" uninfluenced by Roslin's efforts. 

 

The court ultimately qualified it's holding, stating that "having the same nuclear DNA as the donor . . . may not necessarily result in patent ineligibility in every case," but that in this case "the claims do not describe clones that have markedly different characteristics from the donor animals of which they are copies."

 

The full opinion is available here

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: "Insolubly Ambiguous" Standard not Applicable at the USPTO

In In re Packard the Federal Circuit held that the USPTO need not follow the insolubly ambiguous standard in order to satisfy a prima facie rejection for indefiniteness.  Rather, the Federal Circuit held that

when the USPTO has initially issued a well-grounded rejection that identifies ways in which language in a claim is ambiguous, vague, incoherent, opaque, or otherwise unclear in describing and defining the claimed invention, and thereafter the applicant fails to provide a satisfactory response, the USPTO can properly reject the claims claim as [indefinite]. 

(emphasis added).  The Federal Circuit tempered this holding by citing to Georgia-Pacific Corp. v. U.S. Plywood Corp., 258 F.2d 124, 136 (2d Cir. 1958), stating,

At the same time, this requirement is not a demand for unreasonable precision.  The requirement, applied to the real world of modern technology, does not contemplate in every case a verbal precision of the kind found in mathematics. . . .  Rather, how much clarity is required necessarily invokes some standard of reasonable precision in the use of language in the context of the circumstances.

 The patent application on appeal (Serial No. 12/004,324) was directed to a coin change holder shown in Figures 1 and 2 above.  Claims 28 through 37 were on appeal—claims 1 through 27 were cancelled during prosecution.  Claim 28 is representative of the issue on appeal:

28.       I claim a small, thin, flat plane, rectangular change holding card and wallet/billfold or purse construction with the front top side of the card comprising three raised, straight, parallel, double flanged separators and two raised, straight, parallel, double flanged side edges and a raised side edge end thereby forming four parallel, side by side, flanged coin holding channels or rows of the same length and of different widths, one for quarters, one for dimes, one for nickels, and one for pennies, that are similarly blocked at one side edge by the raised side end edge with the other side of the channel/rows open except for small, fixed, flexible, partially moveable, rubber or plastic retainers that are attached to the topside and ends of the double flanged separators such that coins can be retained on the card and yet slide freely above the surface of the card and obliquely overlap as necessary within the channel/rows between the separators while the bottom, back side of the card is constructed with a wallet, billfold or purse extending from it.

The Examiner rejected the claim as indefinite for lack of written description and as obvious.  The Examiner asserted that multiple limitations were indefinite for lacking antecedent basis or "were otherwise unclear."  Mr. Packard appealed to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB).  The PTAB affirmed the rejection citing MPEP § 2173.05(e) which states, "[a] claim is indefinite when it contains words or phrases whose meaning is unclear."  Mr. Packard appealed the PTAB's decision to the Federal Circuit.  On appeal, Mr. Packard argued that the test applied by the PTAB, as set forth in the MPEP, fails to meet the insolubly ambiguous standard articulated by the Federal Circuit. 

The Federal Circuit noted that no case had previously addressed the question presented by this case—"what standard for indefiniteness should the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office apply to pre-issuance claims." The Federal Circuit made clear that a different standard applies to pre-issuance claims (i.e. patent applications under prosecution) that to post-issuance claims (i.e. when an issued patent is being challenged).  Further, the Federal Circuit noted a basis for its decision is that "Congress assigned to the USPTO the responsibility to examine applications to ensure compliance with the statutory criteria for issuance of a patent."  Thus, "indefiniteness rejections by the USPTO arise in a different posture from that of indefiniteness challenges to an issued patent."  

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: USPTO Issues New Examination Guidelines for Patent Subject Matter Eligibility

The basic requirements for filing a U.S. utility patent are rather straightforward. Patents are granted for new, useful and non-obvious processes, products or compositions of matter. Similarly, any new, useful and non-obvious improvement to these categories of inventions may be granted a patent. Although seemingly straightforward, the three basic requirements for patentability are impacted by an evolving legal landscape which is largely dictated by court-created case law. 

 

For much of the last thirty years, the case law addressing patent eligibility has had some consistency.  However, a series of court decisions in recent years has changed the understanding of what is considered patent-eligible.  As a result, the USPTO released guidelines last month providing an analytical framework to evaluate whether a patent claim meets these patent subject matter eligibility requirements (as set forth in 35 USC § 101). These guidelines titled "Guidance for Determining Subject Matter Eligibility of Claims Reciting or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural Products" are particularly relevant for those dealing with patent applications (and portfolios) in the fields of biotechnology, chemistry and/or life sciences. Although subject matter eligibility is applicable for all fields of patenting, the guidelines were provided to patent examiners to specifically address examination of claims “reciting or involving laws of nature/natural principles, natural phenomena, and/or natural products” (i.e. applying the legal principles set forth in the Myriad and Prometheus decisions, see earlier FileWrapper postings for further detail).

 

A few key points to consider in light of the USPTO guidelines (available at http://www.uspto.gov/patents/law/exam/myriad-mayo_guidance.pdf) include the following:

 

1.      The guidelines apply to all claims (excluding "abstract ideas")

Any claims that “recite or involve laws of nature/natural principles, natural phenomena, and/or natural products” are to be examined using the new guidelines. The only exclusion is a claim which is alleged to recite an “abstract idea,” which will not be examined using the new guidelines.

 

2.      Natural products are very broadly defined

The guidelines define natural products broadly, including “substances found in or derived from nature.” The take-home for patent Examiners is that claimed subject matter for a product must be non-naturally occurring to be subject matter eligible. In addition, to meet requirements of non-obviousness, the non-naturally occurring product must be “markedly different in structure from naturally occurring products.”

 

3.      There is a 3-part eligibility test to be applied by Examiners

The guidelines provide Examiners with a decision tree for determining patent subject matter eligibility (reproduced at the beginning of this post).  The first question asked by an examiner when evaluating a patent claim will be whether the claimed invention is directed to a statutory patent-eligible subject matter category (process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter).

If the first threshold is met, the examiner will next question whether the claim recites or involves a judicial exception, which therefore precludes patentability. Examples of these exceptions include abstract ideas, laws of nature (i.e. natural principles), natural phenomena, and natural products.

Finally, the third question to be assessed by an examiner under the guidelines is whether the claim as a whole recites something "significantly different" than the mentioned judicial exception. The guidelines provide more extensive analysis of what constitutes a "significant" difference. Generally, there must be a showing that the product claimed has a marked difference from what exists in nature, or also recites a meaningful limitation to add something of significance to the patent claim.



We note that the guidelines were created by the USPTO for the USPTO examiners. Therefore, they are an interpretation of case law relating to subject matter eligibility. They are not binding law, and they are subject to change and/or judicial challenge. However, they can be helpful in navigating the area between patentable and unpatentable subject matter. 

 

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Federal Circuit Clarifies Patent Term Adjustment

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has issued an opinion that provides guidance for how Patent Term Adjustments should be calculated.

Between June 2009 and May 2011, Novartis filed four civil lawsuits against the Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia claiming that, for twenty-three of its issued patents, the Director had improperly determined the amount of patent term adjustment (PTA).  On February 16, 2012, the district court consolidated the cases.    

Novartis claimed that the Director’s determinations of the patent term adjustment were erroneous because they were based on two mistaken interpretations of the PTA statute as it applies to an applicant’s request for continued examination (RCE).   The District Court held that for the patents where review of PTA was applicable, the Director’s determinations were incorrect, and granted Novartis the additional patent term.  On appeal, the Federal Circuit court affirmed-in-part and reversed-in-part the District Court’s ruling, concluding that Novartis was entitled to most—but not all—of the additional patent term adjustment it sought.   

The portion of the PTA statute relevant to this case is set out in in 35 U.S.C. § 154(b).  This provision states:

 

if the issue of an original patent is delayed due to the failure of the United States Patent and Trademark Office to issue a patent within 3 years after the actual filing date of the application under section 111(a) in the United States or, in the case of an international application, the date of commencement of the national stage under section 371 in the international application, not including—

(i)      any time consumed by continued examination of the application requested by the applicant under section 132(b);

(ii)     any time consumed by a proceeding  under section 135(a), any time consumed by the imposition of an order under section 181, or any time consumed by appellate review by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board or by a Federal court; or

(iii)    any delay in the processing of the application by the United States Patent and Trademark Office requested by the applicant except as permitted by paragraph (3)(C), the term of the patent shall be extended 1 day for each day after the end of that 3-year period until the patent is issued.

Novartis asserted that the PTA it was granted on its patents was incorrect because the Director erroneously interpreted this provision to provide that (1) time spent in any continuing examination, no matter when initiated by the applicant, does not count towards tolling the statute’s three year allotment, and (2) both the time from initiation of continued examination to allowance and the time from allowance to issuance do not count toward tolling the three year allotment.  The Federal Circuit agreed with the PTO on the first issue and Novartis on the second.    

In finding that the Director's first interpretation of § 154(b) is correct, the court held that the best reading of the statute is that "the [PTA] time should be calculated by determining the length of the time between application and patent issuance, then subtracting any continued examination time and determining the extent to which the result exceeds three years."   The court concluded that this interpretation is fairest to the applicant while also conforming to the statute's purpose.

In ruling for Novartis on the second issue, the court determined that there is no basis in the statute for distinguishing a continued-examination case from a case not involving a continued examination.  As a result the court held that any time between allowance and issuance should count toward the PTO’s three year allotment, regardless of whether there has been any continued examination.  

The full opinion is available here.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Bring on the New Year—What is in Store for IP in 2014?

Happy New Year to all of our FilewrapperÒ followers! We hope 2013 was a productive year and wish you the best in 2014. As the New Year quickly approaches we would like to share with you a few predictions for 2014 for you to look forward to and for which to prepare!

·         Increased opportunities for quasi-litigation under AIA.  Various new mechanisms are available to challenge patents under the America Inventors Act (also referred to as “AIA” or “Patent Reform”) many provisions of which took effect in 2013. New strategies are available to challenge patents at the USPTO instead of challenging in court, providing distinct advantages—and some disadvantages.  Inter Partes Review, Post-Grant Review and transitional programs specific for business method patents are quasi-litigation proceedings which are heard by a panel of USTPO administrative law judges.  Ex Parte Reexamination—which has been available since 1981—also remains to allow a patent challenge to be heard by a patent examiner, requiring little from the challenger other than filing required papers with some evidence of patent invalidity.  The cost for ex-parte reexamination has significantly increased, although it remains a far less expensive option than litigation with the courts.

·         (Finally) an international design patent application is available!  Design patents protect a product’s new, original and ornamental design.  Design patents present a smart option for investment in protecting a product, since they cost significantly less than utility patents and are generally granted at a much faster rate.  In addition to these benefits of filing design patents, changes in international design registration under the Hague Agreement may facilitate more effective international protection for your design inventions.  Effective December 18, 2013 a single international application designating a variety of countries for protection can be filed through the International Bureau of WIPO.  This is beneficially a single international application to be filed at one location, which will ultimately be examined by many different Offices thereafter to provide more prompt and cost effective options for design protection.  Over 60 countries and territories—including the European Union—are members of the Hague Agreement.  However, there are various countries that are excluded from this treaty (e.g. Australia, Canada, China, Mexico, Japan, India, and Brazil), which would require a separate application as has been done in the past for foreign design patents.  Nonetheless, the Hague Agreement provides significant improvements for international design protection.

·         (Some USPTO) Fees Decrease January 1, 2014.  In addition to the new classification of “micro-entity” status for Applicants to receive 75% reduction of some USPTO fees that took effect in 2013, the New Year also brings certain fee reductions.  Notably, Issue Fee payments for granted patents are substantially reduced (from $1,780 to $960 for large entity), along with the removal of publication fees and assignment recordation fees.  Reissue patent, design patent and plant patent issue fees are also decreasing.  In addition, in 2014 certain PCT fees will be eligible for payment under small and micro entity status.

·         The search continues for a test to determine patentable subject matter under §101.  The Supreme Court will hear CLS Bank v. Alice in 2014 after the Federal Circuit’s en banc decision in 2013 found many software patents to be ineligible.  The Supreme Court will again try to define an abstract idea in considering whether claims to a computerized method (using a computer-readable medium and a computer to implement instructions) is patentable subject matter.  Both the Federal Circuit and patentees are still searching for a test under §101 that is “consistent, cohesive, and accessible [to provide] guidance and predictability for patent applicants and examiners, litigants, and the courts.”

·         We may receive further guidance on Claim Indefiniteness.  The Supreme Court is expected to grant certiorari on Nautilus v. Biosig Instruments involving indefiniteness under §112, second paragraph to determine whether claims having multiple reasonable interpretations are too ambiguous and would render a patent unenforceable for lack of written description.

·         Protecting American from “Patent Trolls.”  As previously reported on FilewrapperÒ, there is legislative movement in the House and Senate to limit lawsuits which can be filed by non-practicing entities (NPEs or Patent Trolls).  There seems to be great energy around limiting “frivolous” lawsuits in our court system.  In early 2014, the Senate will consider a companion bill to Senate 1720 ("Patent Transparency and Improvements Act of 2013"), which is said to already have support from the White House.  If legislation passes the Senate, then the House and Senate bills will need to be reconciled before being sent to the President.

·         New Patent Director.  Stay tuned for further administrative changes at the USPTO as the new Director, Michelle Lee, takes office January 13, 2014. The former Google executive has been made deputy director of the USPTO, and in that capacity will take on the duties of acting director.  Lee has issued statements planning to “attack” the backlog of unexamined patents (remains at more than 500,000) and improve patent quality with improved inter partes review.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: USPTO Proposes Rule Changes for International Design Applications

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is seeking comments on it proposed rules for implementing the provisions of Title I of the Patent Law Treaties Implementation Act of 2012.  The law is the implementing legislation for the 1999 Geneva Act of the Hague Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Industrial Designs (“the Hague Agreement”).  The rules proposed rule changes under the law will allow applicants to file a single international design application; U.S. applicants will be able to file a single application, potentially seeking protection of an industrial design in more than 40 territories.

Under the proposed rules, international design applications could be filed by U.S. applicants in the USPTO as an office of indirect filing, meaning that the USPTO would transmit the international design application to the International Bureau of the World Intellectual Property Organization (“WIPO”).  The International Bureau would review the application for compliance with the applicable formal requirements under the Hague Agreement. Where these requirements have been met, the International Bureau would register the industrial design in the International Register and, subsequently, publish the international registration and send a copy of the publication to each designated office. Since international registration would only occur after the International Bureau finds that the application conforms to the applicable formal requirements, examination before the Office would generally be limited to substantive matters.

According to the USPTO proposal, the “major changes to U.S. practice in title I of the PLTIA pertain to: (1) Standardizing formal requirements for international design applications; (2) establishing the USPTO as an office through which international design applications may be filed; (3) providing a right of priority with respect to international design applications; (4) treating an international design application that designates the United States as having the same effect from its filing date as that of a national design application; (5) providing provisional rights for published international design applications that designate the United States; (6) setting the patent term for design patents issuing from both national design applications under chapter 16 and international design applications designating the United States to 15 years from the date of patent grant; (7) providing for examination by the Office of international design applications that designate the United States; and (8) permitting an applicant's failure to act within prescribed time limits in an international design application to be excused as to the United States under certain conditions.”

Additional information, including the specific proposed rules and information on how to submit comments, is available here.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: New and Useful - August 26, 2013

·         In University of Utah v. Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, the Federal Circuit held that a patent lawsuit between a state university and the officers of another state university is not a controversy between two states.  The case began when the University of Utah (“UUtah”) sued the Max Planck Institute and the University of Massachusetts (“UMass”) to correct inventorship of two patents—U.S. Patent Nos. 7,056,704 and 7,078,196.  The basis of UUtah’s claim was that the named inventor of the patents—Dr. Thomas Tuschl, a UMass Professor—incorporated the ideas of a UUtah Professor—Dr. Brenda Bass—and did not name her as an inventor.  UMass argued that the dispute was between two states as both UUtah and UMass are state institutions.  This presents constitutional law questions.  In particular, two provisions of the Constitution are at issue, Article 3, §2, cl.2 and the 11th Amendment.  The 11th Amendment provides sovereign immunity to state governments from any cause of action brought by citizens of another state in Federal Court.  However, Article III of the Constitution provides for state-versus-state lawsuits, for which the United States Supreme Court has original jurisdiction.  Thus, under UMass’s argument, only the United States Supreme Court should have jurisdiction to hear the matter.  In response to UMass’s argument, UUtah amended its complaint and substituted UMass with four UMass officials as defendants.  The district court held that the action was no longer a state-versus-state action and could proceed.  Immediate appeal was heard by the Federal Circuit, which affirmed the district court in a 2-1 decision.  Judge Moore provided a notable dissent arguing that UMass is an indispensable party and should be a named defendant and the case is in fact a controversy between two states.

·         In Skinmedica v. Histogen, the Federal Circuit affirmed summary judgment of non-infringement.  Skinmedica asserted infringement of two of its patents covering methods for producing dermatological products containing “novel cell culture medium compositions.”  The Federal Circuit noted that “[d]uring prosecution of the ’494 patent, the inventors limited their claimed inventions to pharmaceutical compositions comprising cell culture medium conditioned by animal cells only in three-dimensions” in order to overcome an anticipation rejection.  Histogen cultures cells beginning with “one- or two-dimensional growth” on beads that “evolves into a three-dimensional growth phase in which the cells crawl off the beads.”  On appeal Skinmedica argued “that the district court erroneously excluded beads from the definition of ‘culturing . . . cells in three-dimensions.’”  The Federal Circuit, however, found no basis to overturn the district court’s construction of the phrase “culturing . . . cells in three-dimensions.”  This was because the patents-in-suit define “three dimensional culturing” to exclude beads by “expressly confin[ing] culturing with beads to two-dimensional culturing.”  In light of this, the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s grant of summary judgment of non-infringement. 

·         In Ex parte Mewherter, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board held that a software composition cannot meet the requirements of patentable subject-matter under § 101 unless the invention excludes transitory media such as signals and carrier waves.  Independent claim 16 was rejected under § 101.  Claim 16 recited in pertinent part, “A machine readable storage medium having stored thereon a computer program for converting a slide show presentation for use within a non-presentation application.”  The Examiner rejected the claim arguing that the phrase “machine-readable storage medium” encompassed transitory media “such as signals, carrier waves, etc.”  The patent Applicant—IBM—countered that the term “storage” differentiates the claimed invention from the non-patentable subject matter “machine-readable medium” because it requires permanent storage.  The Board, however, affirmed the Examiner’s rejection noting that the specification failed to exclude transitory signals from its definition of “machine-readable storage medium.”  As a result, the Board held that one of skill in the art would construe the term to encompass transitory media and not be limited exclusively to permanent storage media.

More Entries

BlogCFC was created by Raymond Camden. This blog is running version 5.8.001.