MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Critical Versus Optional, but Desireable Claim Elements

On August 6, 2014, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in ScriptPro, LLC v. Innovation Associates, Inc. In 2006, the Petitioner ScriptPro, LLC sued Innovation Associates, Inc. for infringement of claims 1, 2, 4, and 8 of U.S. Patent No. 6,910,601 ("the '601 patent").  The '601 patent describes a "collating unit" that uses sensors to automatically dispense and organize prescriptions according to individual patients.  Shortly after the lawsuit was filed, Innovation Associates filed an Inter Partes Reexamination with the USPTO, and the district court stayed the proceedings pending the result of the re-exam.  In January of 2011, the USPTO concluded its reexamination of the claims of the '601 patent, confirming claims 1, 2, 4, and 8. 

 

The district court resumed proceedings and Innovation Associates moved for summary judgment, arguing that the claims were invalid under section 112 on the grounds that the patent's specification did not describe the subject matter of the asserted claims.  The claims at issue did not require the use of sensors.  However, the district court agreed with Innovation Associates that the specification of the '601 patent implied that the use of "sensors" is critical to the functionality of the machine. Specifically, the court held, "no reasonable jury could find that the inventors were in possession of a collating unit that operated without sensors." Accordingly, the district court granted Innovation Associate's motion for summary judgment of invalidity for failure to satisfy the written description requirements of § 112. 

 

On appeal, the Federal Circuit reviewed de novo the language of the specification and—after pointing to several places in the specification suggesting the sensor may or may not be used—found that the wording of the specifications made the sensors an "optional, though desirable," feature of the invention.  The Court also pointed to the original claims as filed and noted "[w]hen a specification is ambiguous about which of several features are stand-alone inventions, the original claims can help resolve the ambiguity, though even original claims may be insufficient as descriptions or be insufficiently supported by the rest of the specification."  The Federal Circuit reversed the grant of summary judgment holding that, ScriptPro could establish that a person of skill in the art would be able to tell from description of the specification that "the inventor[s] actually invented the invention claimed."  The Court concluded that, although the machine would be more efficient with the sensors, it could be fully functional without them and, therefore, the written description was sufficient.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: USPTO Patent Invalidation Precludes Judicial Equitable Remedies and Sanctions

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has issued a decision in ePlus, Inc. v. Lawson.  ePlus sued Lawson asserting infringement of two patents—U.S. Patent Nos. 6,023,683 ("the '683 patent") and 6,505,172 ("the '172 patent").  At trial, the district court held two of ePlus's asserted system claims and three of ePlus's asserted method claims not invalid, and the jury found those same claims infringed by Lawson. 

 

The district court entered an injunction against Lawson, precluding Lawson from "directly or indirectly making, using, offering to sell, or selling within the United States or importing into the United States any of the [adjudged infringing] product configurations and/or installation, implementation, design, configuration, consulting, upgrade, maintenance and support and training and other related and associated services and any colorable variations thereof (the “Infringing Products and Services”)." Lawson appealed, and the Federal Circuit reversed in part, holding the system claims invalid and two of three method claims not infringed.  The Federal Circuit remanded the case to district court to modify the injunction accordingly.

 

On remand the district court modified the injunction so that it only applied to infringement of claim 26 of the '683 patent—the sole remaining method claim.  Further, the district court found Lawson in civil contempt for violating the injunction.  Lawson appealed both the injunction and the contempt order.  While the appeal was pended, the United States Patent and Trademark Office ("USPTO") completed a reexamination of the '683 patent and determined that the sole remaining claim from the litigation—method claim 26—was invalid and cancelled.  In a separate appeal, the Federal Circuit affirmed the USPTO's invalidity determination.  Thus, the present appeal presented two questions:  (1) whether the district court’s modified injunction against Lawson should be set aside in light of the PTO's cancellation of the patent claim on which it was based; and (2) whether the civil contempt sanctions should be set aside. 

 

The Federal Circuit held there was no sufficient legal basis to maintain the injunction and that it must be set aside.  In support of this holding, the Federal Circuit noted, "It is well established that an injunction must be set aside when the legal basis for it has ceased to exist. . . .  Our court has applied these principles to an injunction barring infringement of patents later found to be invalid."  Because the sole remaining claim upon which the injunction was based had been invalidated—by the PTO; affirmed by the Federal Circuit—there was no legal basis for maintaining the injunction.

 

The Federal Circuit also held that the civil contempt sanctions should be set aside.  This was, in part, due to the fact that the injunction was not final and because it was a civil contempt order that was meant to compensate the ePlus for injury suffered as a result of the Lawson's infringing activity.  However, as the only remaining claim upon which the injunction was based was found invalid, the Federal Circuit concluded that "the compensatory award for the violation of the injunction must be set aside in light of the cancellation of claim 26."

 

The full opinion is available here.  

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Federal Circuit Holds Common Sense Cannot Establish Presence of an Element

The Federal Circuit's recent decision in K/S HIMPP v. Hear-Wear Technologies presents an interesting development in the law of obviousness.  In affirming a finding of non-obviousness by the PTO Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences ("BPAI"), the Federal Circuit held that while common sense or basic knowledge may provide a reason to combine elements present in the prior art, it cannot establish the presence of an element itself.

 

Hear-Wear Technologies ("Hear-Wear") owns U.S. Patent No. 7,016,512 ("the '512 patent"), relating to a hearing aid that has three components.  The components that make up the hearing aid are a behind the ear audio processing module, an in-the-canal module, and a connector between the two.  Initially, during prosecution, the examiner rejected dependent claims 3 and 9 for obviousness, but ultimately allowed all claims.

 

K/S HIMPP ("HIMPP") filed an inter partes re-examination of the '512 patent, arguing that claims 3 and 9 were obvious for the same reasons supplied by the Examiner during the original prosecution.  The re-examination examiner rejected HIMPP's arguments due to lack of evidence and ultimately maintained the patentability of claims 3 and 9. HIMPP appealed the examiner's decision to the BPAI, which found that although HIMPP argued that the content of claims 3 and 9 was “well known,” HIMPP failed to direct the Board to any portion of the record for underlying factual support for its arguments for obviousness, and therefore affirmed the Examiner.

 

On appeal to the Federal Circuit, HIMPP argued that the detachable connection was already known, and that adding the detachable connection was a natural combination of prior art.  The majority of the panel (Judges Lourie and Wallach) affirmed the BPAI, holding that record evidence was required to support an assertion that the structural features of claims 3 and 9 of the ’512 patent were known prior art elements. Because HIMPP did not provide any evidence, and the Board cannot accept general conclusions about what is “basic knowledge” or “common sense” as a replacement for documentary evidence for core factual findings in a determination of patentability, there was no support for HIMPP's position. 

 

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Bring on the New Year—What is in Store for IP in 2014?

Happy New Year to all of our FilewrapperÒ followers! We hope 2013 was a productive year and wish you the best in 2014. As the New Year quickly approaches we would like to share with you a few predictions for 2014 for you to look forward to and for which to prepare!

·         Increased opportunities for quasi-litigation under AIA.  Various new mechanisms are available to challenge patents under the America Inventors Act (also referred to as “AIA” or “Patent Reform”) many provisions of which took effect in 2013. New strategies are available to challenge patents at the USPTO instead of challenging in court, providing distinct advantages—and some disadvantages.  Inter Partes Review, Post-Grant Review and transitional programs specific for business method patents are quasi-litigation proceedings which are heard by a panel of USTPO administrative law judges.  Ex Parte Reexamination—which has been available since 1981—also remains to allow a patent challenge to be heard by a patent examiner, requiring little from the challenger other than filing required papers with some evidence of patent invalidity.  The cost for ex-parte reexamination has significantly increased, although it remains a far less expensive option than litigation with the courts.

·         (Finally) an international design patent application is available!  Design patents protect a product’s new, original and ornamental design.  Design patents present a smart option for investment in protecting a product, since they cost significantly less than utility patents and are generally granted at a much faster rate.  In addition to these benefits of filing design patents, changes in international design registration under the Hague Agreement may facilitate more effective international protection for your design inventions.  Effective December 18, 2013 a single international application designating a variety of countries for protection can be filed through the International Bureau of WIPO.  This is beneficially a single international application to be filed at one location, which will ultimately be examined by many different Offices thereafter to provide more prompt and cost effective options for design protection.  Over 60 countries and territories—including the European Union—are members of the Hague Agreement.  However, there are various countries that are excluded from this treaty (e.g. Australia, Canada, China, Mexico, Japan, India, and Brazil), which would require a separate application as has been done in the past for foreign design patents.  Nonetheless, the Hague Agreement provides significant improvements for international design protection.

·         (Some USPTO) Fees Decrease January 1, 2014.  In addition to the new classification of “micro-entity” status for Applicants to receive 75% reduction of some USPTO fees that took effect in 2013, the New Year also brings certain fee reductions.  Notably, Issue Fee payments for granted patents are substantially reduced (from $1,780 to $960 for large entity), along with the removal of publication fees and assignment recordation fees.  Reissue patent, design patent and plant patent issue fees are also decreasing.  In addition, in 2014 certain PCT fees will be eligible for payment under small and micro entity status.

·         The search continues for a test to determine patentable subject matter under §101.  The Supreme Court will hear CLS Bank v. Alice in 2014 after the Federal Circuit’s en banc decision in 2013 found many software patents to be ineligible.  The Supreme Court will again try to define an abstract idea in considering whether claims to a computerized method (using a computer-readable medium and a computer to implement instructions) is patentable subject matter.  Both the Federal Circuit and patentees are still searching for a test under §101 that is “consistent, cohesive, and accessible [to provide] guidance and predictability for patent applicants and examiners, litigants, and the courts.”

·         We may receive further guidance on Claim Indefiniteness.  The Supreme Court is expected to grant certiorari on Nautilus v. Biosig Instruments involving indefiniteness under §112, second paragraph to determine whether claims having multiple reasonable interpretations are too ambiguous and would render a patent unenforceable for lack of written description.

·         Protecting American from “Patent Trolls.”  As previously reported on FilewrapperÒ, there is legislative movement in the House and Senate to limit lawsuits which can be filed by non-practicing entities (NPEs or Patent Trolls).  There seems to be great energy around limiting “frivolous” lawsuits in our court system.  In early 2014, the Senate will consider a companion bill to Senate 1720 ("Patent Transparency and Improvements Act of 2013"), which is said to already have support from the White House.  If legislation passes the Senate, then the House and Senate bills will need to be reconciled before being sent to the President.

·         New Patent Director.  Stay tuned for further administrative changes at the USPTO as the new Director, Michelle Lee, takes office January 13, 2014. The former Google executive has been made deputy director of the USPTO, and in that capacity will take on the duties of acting director.  Lee has issued statements planning to “attack” the backlog of unexamined patents (remains at more than 500,000) and improve patent quality with improved inter partes review.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: New and Useful - July 8, 2013

·         The Federal Circuit in Ultramercial, Inc. v. Hulu, LLC held that the district court erred in holding that the subject matter of U.S. Patent No. 7,346,545 ('545) is not a "process" within the language and meaning of 35 U.S.C. § 101.  The Federal Circuit reversed and remanded this case stating the claims were not abstract and were patent eligible.

The '545 patent claims a method for distribution of copyrighted products over the Internet where the consumer receive the product for free in exchange for viewing an advertisement, and the advertiser pays for the copyrighted content.  In other words, it is a method for monetizing and distributing copyrighted products over the Internet.

Ultramercial originally sued Hulu, LLC ("Hulu"), YouTube, LLC ("YouTube"), and WildTangent, Inc. ("WildTangent"), alleging infringement of the '545 patent.  Hulu and YouTube were later dismissed from the case.  WildTangent then moved to dismiss for failure to state a claim under Rule 12(b)(6).  The United States District Court for the Central District of California granted the dismissal holding that patent '545 did not claim patent-eligible subject matter.  The Federal Circuit had previously reversed the district court's holding and remanded the case, but that earlier decision was vacated by the United States Supreme Court. 

The district court’s grant of the motion to dismiss was based on its conclusion that there was no reasonable construction that would render the subject matter patent-eligible.  The Federal Circuit took issue with this approach, and explained that inquiries into patent-eligibility under § 101 would often involve factual questions, and that claim construction would often be necessary.   In this case, the Federal Circuit determined that the factual determinations were key to deciding eligibility, and that a construction most favorable to the patentee should be applied. 

In its analysis, the Federal Circuit reiterated that under the “abstract ideas” limitation to patent-eligibility of 35 U.S.C. § 101, a claim is not patent eligible only if, instead of claiming an application of an abstract idea, the claim is instead to the abstract idea itself.  A claim may be premised on an abstract idea and, indeed, the abstract idea may be of central importance to the invention—the question for patent eligibility is whether the claim contains limitations that meaningfully tie that abstract idea to an actual application of that idea through meaningful limitations.  In determining if the claim is abstract or not, the court must look at the claim as a whole and "cannot go hunting for abstractions by ignoring the concrete, palpable, tangible limitations of the invention the patentee actually claims."

The Federal Circuit looked to the Supreme Court for guidance on discerning whether or not a claim is an abstraction.  First, the Supreme court in Prometheus stated that a claim is not meaningfully limited if it merely describes an abstract idea or in essence simply adds the words "apply it."  Second, a claim is invalid if the subject matter preempts all practical uses of an abstract idea.  In other words, a claim is invalid if it covers every practical application of that abstract idea.  Finally, the Supreme Court in Prometheus stated "that a claim is not meaningfully limited if its purported limitations provided no real direction, cover all possible ways to achieve the provided result, or are overly-generalized."

With this guidance in mind, the Federal Court held that the claims of '545 were patent eligible and not invalid under § 101.  The court noted that by its terms, patent '545 invokes computers and applications of computer technology.  Even without claim construction, several of the steps require that the method be performed though computers, on the internet, and in a cyber-market environment.  Further, if the products are offered for sale on the internet, they must be restricted by complex computer programming as well.  Viewing the subject matter as a whole, the invention recites a process, it does not pre-empt all use of the abstract idea, the recited steps are not all pre- or post-solution steps, and the claim is not overly generalized.  The claims also do not involve a mathematical algorithm, a series of purely mental steps, or any similarly abstract idea.  Thus the claims of patent '545 were found to be patent-eligible.  

  

·         In Authors Guild v. Google Inc., the Second Circuit vacated a class certification by the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, and remanded the case back for further consideration, without prejudice to any renewal of the motion for class certification.

The suit commenced in 2005 when The Authors Guild, an association of authors, and several individual authors sued Google alleging copyright infringement by Google Books.  Google Books would scan and index books and make short snippets of the books available for public viewing without payment to the authors.

Following a course of discovery and settlement agreements, both parties moved for an approval of an amended proposed class settlement agreement.  After the court refused the motion, the plaintiff moved to certify a proposed class of "[a]ll persons residing in the United States who hold a United States copyright interest in one or more books reproduced by Google."  The district court allowed the certification.  Google opposed the motion for class certification and appealed the District Court's grant of class certification to the Second Circuit.  In its appeal, Google stated they intended to raise a "fair use" defense, which might moot the litigation.  Google also raised the defense that the class representatives do not adequately protect the interests of the class as a whole.

The appellate court set aside Google's second defense and chose to just focus on the fair use argument, stating "the resolution of Google's fair use defense in the first instance will necessarily inform and perhaps moot our analysis of many class certification issues."  The court believed that Google's fair use defense should be fully resolved before questions regarding class certification are decided on.  The court vacated the District Court's decision to allow certification of the proposed class and remanded the case back for consideration of the fair use issues, without prejudice to any renewal of the motion for class certification.

·         In Fresenius USA v. Baxter Inter'l, the Federal Circuit decided whether the cancellation of the asserted claims by the United States Patent and Trademark Office ("PTO"), pursuant to the agency's statutory reexamination authority, must be given effect in pending infringement litigation.  The Federal Circuit held that it did, and dismissed the district court's decision and remanded with instructions to dismiss.

The case commenced when Fresenius USA and Fresenius Medical Care Holdings (collectively, "Fresenius") brought a declaratory judgment action against Baxter International and Baxter Healthcare Corporation (collectively "Baxter") alleging that claims of U.S. Patent No. 5, 247, 434 ('434) were invalid and not infringed.  Baxter counterclaimed for infringement.  The district court found in favor of Baxter that Fresenius infringed the claims and that the claims were not invalid.  The Federal Circuit affirmed the district court's ruling, but remanded to reconsider its injunction and post-verdict damages.

While the litigation was pending on remand to the District Court, the PTO completed a reexamination of the patent and determined that all asserted claims were invalid.  After the PTO made its determination, the district court entered judgment against Fresenius in the pending infringement proceeding.  On appeal, Fresenius argued that Baxter no longer had a cause of action because the PTO gave its ruling before the district court gave theirs.

The reexamination statute of 1928 authorized the PTO to reconsider patents of "doubtful" validity, and to cancel "defectively examined and therefore erroneously granted patents."  Looking at the language and legislative history, the court noted that reexamination is supposed to occur concurrently with litigation, and that cancellation of claims during reexamination would be binding on concurrent infringement litigation.  After looking at all applicable precedent, the court concluded that if the PTO confirms the original claim in identical form, a suit based on that claim may continue, but if the original claim is cancelled or amended to cure invalidity, the patentee's cause of action is extinguished and the suit would fail.

Baxter contends that this rule does not apply to the present case because their case was conclusively decided before PTO gave their decision.  The Federal Circuit disagreed. The court stated that their original decision was not sufficiently final as to immunize it from the PTO's decision.  The court's original decision left open many aspects that still needed to be decided upon by the lower court.  The court explained "it is well-established that where the scope of relief remains to be determined, there is no final judgment binding the parties or the court."  For the PTO's decision to have no effect, a final decree must have been given, leaving nothing further to be done except the execution of it.  Since the PTO invalidated the claims before the lower court decided the injunction and post-verdict damages issues, Baxter no longer had a cause of action and the suit would fail.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Supreme Court Rejects Patent Exhaustion Defense for Patented Bean Replanting

The Supreme Court has handed down its much anticipated decision in Bowman v. Monsanto Co., holding that the defense of patent exhaustion does not apply to the practice of planting and harvesting patented seeds through planting and harvesting without the patent holder's permission.

The case centers on the Roundup Ready gene, which confers resistance to glyphosate herbicides such as Roundup. Monsanto owns U.S. Patent Nos. 5,352,605 and RE39,247E, which cover the Roundup Ready gene, as well as seeds incorporating the gene. The Roundup Ready gene stably integrated into the genomic material of soybeans sold by Monsanto, which means that once the seeds are planted, the plants that grow from those seeds and any seeds produced by that plant also have the Roundup Ready gene.

Monsanto markets both the Roundup Ready seeds and the Roundup herbicide to farmers. However, the seeds are sold subject to a licensing agreement that permits a grower to plant the purchased seed in only one growing season-the grower in prohibited from saving any of the harvested seed for replanting in a subsequent growing season. Growers are permitted under the agreement to consume the seeds or to sell the seeds as a commodity for eventual consumption. Due to the popularity of Roundup Ready seeds, a significant proportion of commodity seeds are Roundup Ready.

Vernon Bowman purchased Roundup Ready seeds from a licensed seller each year for his first planting of the growing season. Bowman also made a second planting each season, for which he used seed that was not purchased from a licensed seller. Instead, Bowman purchased commodity seed, planted the seed, treated the plants with glyphosphate herbicide, and harvested the seed from the surviving plants, which he then used for second plantings in subsequent growing seasons. Because these seeds survived the glyphosphate herbicide treatment, they necessarily possessed the Roundup Ready gene. Ultimately, Bowman harvested eight crops through this system of growing and replanting, effectively generating a homogenous Roundup Ready source of seed that was not purchased from Monsanto.

Monsanto sued Bowman in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, alleging that Bowman's harvesting and replanting of Roundup Ready seeds infringed its patents. In his defense, Bowman asserted that the doctrine of patent exhaustion prevented Monsanto from controlling his use of the seeds because they were the subject of a prior authorized sale. The trial court rejected Bowman's patent exhaustion defense, finding for Monsanto. On appeal, the Federal Circuit affirmed, concluding that the patent exhaustion defense was not available to Bowman because he had created newly infringing articles through the harvesting and replanting-Bowman had replicated Monsanto's patented technology by planting the seeds and thereby creating newly infringing plants and seeds.

The Supreme Court, like the district court and the Federal Circuit, concluded that Bowman could not rely on the doctrine of patent exhaustion. The Court held that while the patent exhaustion doctrine restricts a patentee's right to control what others can do with a particular article sold, it does not affect the patentee's ability to prevent a buyer from making new copies of a patented item. Thus, the Court determined that the patent exhaustion doctrine enabled Bowman to resell the patented commodity soybeans he purchased, or consume the beans, or feed them to his animals without interference from Monsanto, but it did not enable Bowman to make additional patented soybeans without Monsanto's permission.

The Court relied on its precedent in J.E.M. Ag. Supply, Inc. v. Pioneer Hi-Bred Int'l, Inc., where the Court explained that only a patent holder, and not the holder of a certificate issued under the Plant Variety Protection Act, could prohibit a farmer who legally purchases and plants a protected seed from saving harvested seed for replanting. The Court also dismissed Bowman's argument that patent exhaustion should apply in this case because soybeans naturally self-replicate, and therefore the seeds themselves-and not Bowman-were responsible for producing copies. Such a "blame-the-bean" defense was unpersuasive in light of the Bowman's active role in purchasing, planting, selecting, harvesting, and replanting the infringing seeds for eight successive crops.

The Court took care to limit its holding to the situation before it, stating that it is a closer question as to whether the patent exhaustion doctrine would apply where an article's self-replication occurs outside the purchaser's control, or is necessary by incidental step in using the item for another purpose.

Federal Circuit Addresses Obviousness Rationales and Counterarguments

Recently, the Federal Circuit issued its opinion in CW Zumbiel v. Kappos.  The Federal Circuit affirmed the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences’ (“BPAI”) finding that multiple claims in U.S. Patent No. 6,715,639 (“the ’639 patent”) were obvious and therefore invalid.  The 639 patent is directed to a “carton with an improved dispenser.”  The carton is for holding cans or bottles and the improved dispenser is a flap that permits dispensing of the cans or bottles without compromising the structure of the carton so that the remaining cans or bottles are secure within the container.  The 639 patent issued to Graphic Packaging International, Inc. (“Graphic”).  Upon issuance CW Zumbiel Co., Inc. (“Zumbiel”) challenged the validity of the 639 patent by instituting an inter partes reexamination.  During the inter partes reexamination, the Examiner rejected multiple claims for obviousness, while maintaining the patentability of other claims.  Graphic appealed the Examiner’s rejections to the BPAI, which subsequently affirmed the patentability of some claims and the rejection of the other claims based on obviousness over Ellis, U.S. Patent No. 3,178242, in view of German Gebrauchsmuster No. G85 14718.4.  Zumbiel appealed the BPAI’s finding that some claims were patentable and Graphic cross-appealed the finding that other claims were obvious.

One limitation that was found obvious was the “finger-flap,” which opens across the top panel of the carton.  Graphic argued that the limitation would not be obvious over the combination of references because they open in different ways—Ellis is laid on its side and opens on the back while the German patent opens from the top.  The Federal Circuit affirmed the BPAI’s finding of obviousness quoting the BPAI, which stated, “‘providing the finger opening on the top wall of the carton would be a predictable variation that enhances user convenience, as evidenced by German ’718, and is within the skill of a person of ordinary skill in the art.’”

Another limitation that was found obvious was the “fold-line” limitation, which provides a fold-line so that the flap can be folded back to cover the opening.  Graphic argued that the German reference did not teach such a flap, but rather was directed to a container allowing simultaneous removal and replacement of bottles through an opening that could either be a perforated line or a fold line.  The Federal Circuit affirmed the BPAI’s finding that the fold-line limitation was obvious over the cited references as the combination teaches that a tear-line can be replaced by a fold-line, which would be obvious to one of skill in the art. 

Zumbiel disputed the BPAI’s determination that claim 2 was not obvious.  Claim 2 was directed to the placement of the finger-flap between the first and second cans.  Zumbiel argued that the placement would have been obvious in light of the combination of references.  The Federal Circuit, however, affirmed the BPAI’s finding that the prior art reference at issue—Palmer, U.S. Patent No. 2,718,301—only taught where to place a handle formed by the perforated tear-line on the container, not where to place perforation for an opening.  Moreover, the Federal Circuit noted that one of the references actually taught away from the placement of the tear-line in claim 2.  Therefore, the combination of references could not render claim 2 obvious.

Ultimately the Federal Circuit affirmed the BPAI’s findings in whole.  The opinion demonstrates examples teaching away, predictable variations in light of the knowledge of one skilled in the art of the invention, and a proper combination of references.

Dissent

Judge Prost dissented in part arguing that claim 2 should have been found obvious based in light of the KSR decision and the applicability of common sense in the obviousness determination.  The dissent, quite candidly, sets out the invention of the ’639 invention, its common sense understanding, and the teachings of the prior art that had existed for “almost fifty years.”  Judge Prost took issue with the finding that placement of the tear-line was unobvious:

The secret lies in the proper positioning of the tear line.  That is, according to the Board, ordinary box makers would not have put the tear line between the first two cans in the top row.  Where else could have they put it? There are just four other options: (1) above the first can, (2) above the second can, (3) in front of the first can, (4) behind the second can.  The first two alternatives are just offensive to common sense: With the cans right below, there would be no room to push the flap through (the flap is positioned at the center of the tear line). The third and fourth options are not quite as illogical, but even without expertise in box making, one may intuit that they make awkward designs (the third opens too little, the fourth too much).  More importantly, however, whether some of the alternatives would work just as well or not, the patentee’s choice of tear-line-placement involves no more than the exercise of common sense . . . .

As such, Judge Prost concludes that the invention of claim 2 would have been obvious, particularly when viewed in light of the prior art.

The full text of the Federal Circuit opinion is available here.  

Grant of stay while preliminary injunction motion pending abuse of discretion

In a recent decision, the Federal Circuit found that a district court's grant of a stay pending inter partes reexamination without considering the patentee's pending motion for a preliminary injunction was an abuse of discretion. The Federal Circuit held the grant of the stay effectively denied the preliminary injunction motion, thereby making the stay order appealable. The court then held the district court should have considered the preliminary injunction motion and, after considering the four preliminary injunction factors, made a determination regarding the injunction before staying the proceedings for the reexamination.

More detail on Procter & Gamble Co. v. Kraft Foods Global, Inc. after the jump.

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Federal Circuit invalidates Patent on Nobel-Prize winning invention after 50 years of prosecution

In an appeal from the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences, the Federal Circuit affirmed the Board's rejection of the claims based upon obviousness-type double patenting over previously-granted related patents.  The technical aspects of the invention are complex, but are overshadowed by the procedural aspects of this reexamination.  The majority and dissenting opinions seem to discuss two different cases.  The majority holds the double patenting issue was available in the reexamination under the former § 303 (in part because the rejection at issue was made after the amendment), and the dissent holds the reexamination improper because the issue was previously considered.  The majority holds the expert declarations unpersuasive, but the dissent considers them unrebutted.  In the end, the rejections are affirmed, even though the patents covered an invention that resulted in a Nobel Prize to one of the inventors.

More detail of In re Basell Poliolefine Italia S.P.A. after the jump.

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Federal Circuit declines to consider constitutionality of BPAI judge appointments, affirms rejection

In a decision this week, the Federal Circuit decided a case involving both obviousness and the Appointments Clause relating to allegedly unconstitutional appointment of members of the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences.  The court determined that appellants failed to timely raise the issue of the constitutionality of the Appointments Clause by not presenting it to the Board, and therefore waived the issue on appeal.  

On the merits, the court agreed there was a substantial new question of patentability and therefore reexamination was properly granted.  The court also agreed with the Board that the evidence of commercial success did not rebut the prima facie case of obviousness, as there was no evidence that the commercial success was the "driving force" behind the sales of the patented product.  Accordingly, the court affirmed the rejection of the claims.

More on In re DBC after the jump.

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