Another Billion Dollar Patent Verdict

Another billion dollar verdict has been handed out in a patent case.  Read the verdict in Carnegie Mellon University v. Marvell Technology Group, LTD. here.  This latest case continues a string of billion dollar verdicts highlighted by Jonathan Kennedy in the latest edition of MVS Briefs. 

Carnegie Mellon brought suit alleging infringement of two of its patents, Patent No. 6,201,839 and Patent No. 6,438,180, relating to integrated circuits for computer memory systems.  Marvell asserted that it did not infringe the patents, and in the alternative, the patents were invalid because they were anticipated or rendered obvious by the prior art.

The jury in the case found for Carnegie Mellon on all counts of infringement—including indirect infringement—and invalidity.  In addition to the large damages award, the jury determined that Marvell had engaged in willful infringement of two patents held by Carnegie Mellon because Marvell knew of the asserted patents before the lawsuit, had no reasonable defense for its actions, and knew or should have known that its actions would infringe the asserted patents.  The determination of willfulness by the jury could allow the presiding judge, U.S. District Judge Norra Barry Fischer, to triple the damages award. 

 A final judgment in the case is expected in May 2013, pending post-trial motions from both sides.  Marvell has already announced its intent to appeal the verdict should its post-trial motions prove unsuccessful. 

Comments (Comment Moderation is enabled. Your comment will not appear until approved.)
BlogCFC was created by Raymond Camden. This blog is running version 5.8.001.