MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Is the Supreme Court Re-Aiming Markman?

Post by Alex Christian

The 1996 United States Supreme Court decision in Markman v. Westview Instruments established a landmark change for claim construction in patent infringement cases.  That case established that the meaning of the claim language of a patent is a matter of law for a judge to decide, and not a matter of fact that should be determined by the jury. Since the decision, what is now known as a "Claim Construction Hearing" or a "Markman hearing" is now common place in patent infringement cases.  Nearly two decades after the Markman decision, the Supreme Court has taken a case with the potential to dramatically alter this aspect of patent litigation.

The Markman hearing has become one of—if not the single—most important events in a patent infringement case.  In a Markman hearing, the Court is required to interpret any claims at issue in the case brought forth by the parties.  This usually includes extensive briefing, expert reports, expert testimony, and oral arguments before the Court. Markman hearings are so important and so influential that often the party who prevails in the Markman hearing will go to be the successful party—whether by trial or by settlement—in the case.

On October 15, 2014, the Supreme Court heard arguments on the case of Teva Pharmaceuticals v. Sandoz.  The case is centered on the question of what appellate rules should apply to claim construction decisions.  Currently, there is tension between the Federal Circuit case law and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure regarding the way in which a district court's factual findings relating to claim construction are treated on appeal. The specific issue presented to the Supreme Court is:   

Whether a district court's factual finding in support of its construction of a patent claim term may be reviewed de novo, as the Federal Circuit requires (and as the panel explicitly did in this case) or only for clear error, as Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 52(a) requires.

Among the issues addressed during oral arguments, a significant amount of the debate dealt with the framework through which to view patent claims: similar to statues, which receive a de novo review; or like contracts, for which the district courts are given deference for underlying conclusions. You can find the transcript to the oral arguments here.

This particular case highlights the complexities Markman hearings have introduced into patent litigation, and the potentially tenuous ground upon which patent litigation has settled in the last several decades.  Perhaps the most complex issue that could be raised by the Supreme Court's eventual decision in this case, is that Markman hearings are considered by some as a violation of a plaintiff patent-owner's 7th Amendment right to a jury trial.

For additional background on the Markman decision, see Ed Sease's article, "Markman Misses the Mark, Miserably" available here.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: 2014 World Food Day and Borlaug Dialogue Takes Place in Des Moines Iowa

Post by Jill Link

 

The 2014 theme for World Food Day was “Family Farming: Feeding the world, caring for the earth.”  This event took place during the 2014 Borlaug Dialogue International Symposium held in Des Moines, Iowa.  MVS was represented by attorney Scott Johnson to honor the 2014 Laureate, Dr. Sanjaya Rajaram for his work in developing wheat varieties. The various events taking place this week are raising awareness of the impact of family farming and smallholder farmers.

 

These events highlight the significant efforts of Dr. Rajaram and other individuals implementing biotechnology tools to achieve significant advancements in the effort of feeding the world's population.  It is estimated that over 9 billion people will inhabit the planet earth by 2050 and biotechnology tools are providing significant advancements to achieve the goals and vision Dr. Borlaug set forth. Biotechnology has significantly aided variety development in various crops for use throughout the world. These crops provide opportunity to increase global food security through their increased crop yields, decrease in production costs, and often their decrease in the "environmental footprint" of farmer. The World Food Prize events provide great opportunity to recognize the beneficial impact and humanitarian opportunities afforded by using biotechnology in plants.

 

The annual event originates from Dr.  Norman Borlaug's work in developing wheat varieties suitable for farming in various conditions throughout the world, including Mexico, Asia and Latin America. These efforts were focused on feeding the world and preventing hunger and famine (for which Dr. Borlaug was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize). Dr. Borlaug's efforts to recognize others seeking to meet the challenge of sustainably feeding the world's population resulted in the establishment of The World Food Prize.

  

To learn more about The World Food Prize or the 2014 events taking place in Des Moines, Iowa please visit http://www.worldfoodprize.org/.

MVS Filewrapper® Blog: Federal Circuit Schedules Oral Hearing in First Appeal of Inter Partes Review

Post by Jonathan Kennedy

The Federal Circuit has scheduled oral arguments for the first appeal of an inter partes review ("IPR") decision by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board ("PTAB").  Oral arguments have been scheduled for November 3, 2014.  The appeal involves a number of interesting issues.  First, it arises from the first IPR filed with the PTAB—Garmin USA, Inc. v. Cuozzo Speed Technologies, LLC (IPR2012-00001).  In that IPR, the PTAB invalidated three claims (claims 10, 14, and 17) of U.S. Patent No. 6,778,074.  Second, pursuant to a settlement agreement, Garmin agreed not to take part in any appeal.  Instead, once Cuozzo appealed the PTAB's decision, the Patent Office intervened under 35 USC § 143 to oppose Cuozzo's appeal, effectively taking Garmin's place. 

 

Cuozzo appealed four issues from the PTAB decision, relating both to procedural and substantive matters:  (1) "Whether the PTAB lacked authority to institute IPR for claims 10 and 14 on grounds of unpatentability not identified in the Petition"; (2) "Whether the B[roadest] R[easonable] I[nterpretation] standard applies to IPR, and whether the PTAB erred by construing the term 'integrally attached'"; (3) "Whether, if the PTAB had jurisdiction over claim 10, it erred in cancelling claim 10 as invalid under 35 U.S.C. § 103"; and (4) "Whether the PTAB erred in denying Cuozzo's motion to amend the claims." 

 

The petition for IPR originally filed by Garmin alleged forty-three different grounds of invalidity based on a number of patents.  The PTAB rejected forty-one of those grounds and chose to institute the IPR based on two grounds of invalidity alleged by Garmin against dependent claim 17.  However, when instituting the IPR the PTAB applied those same two grounds of invalidity against claims 10 and 14, even though Garmin had not asserted those grounds against claims 10 or 14.  In its final decision, the PTAB cancelled claims 10, 14, and 17 based on the two grounds Garmin had raised against claim 17.  Whether the PTAB can expand the scope of its review by applying grounds of invalidity against claims in a manner not raised by the Petitioner is a significant question and clarity from the Federal Circuit is greatly anticipated. 

 

Garmin's petition did not set forth any proposed claim constructions.  Despite this, in instituting the IPR—without any input from either party—the PTAB chose to construe the claim term "integrally attached" based on the broadest reasonable interpretation standard.  In its brief, Cuozzo argues this standard is improper for PTAB and only appropriate during examination and reexamination.  Instead, Cuozzo argues that the PTAB should be held to the standards set forth in the Federal Circuit's Phillips' decision.  The PTAB's construction of the term was pivotal in the other decisions in the IPR.  For example, the PTAB denied Cuozzo's motion to amend claims during the IPR under 35 USC § 316(d) based on the construction of the term "integrally attached."  Clarification regarding the claim construction standard that applies to the PTAB will be critical moving forward.

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